Hearing loss

McMurrayB

Bob McMurray

Title/Position
Professor
My research broadly concerns how people recover the meaning of spoken language as it unfolds in real-time, and in particular how they cope with the vast amount of variability in the speech signal. To this end, we use techniques like head-mounted eye-tracking, event-related potentials and inter...
KayA

Alan R. Kay, PhD

Title/Position
Professor
A high concentration of free ionic zinc in synaptic vesicles is a prominent feature of some of the excitatory pathways in the mammalian forebrain. Despite the wealth of information on its distribution, and role in metalloenzymes and proteins, the role of vesicular zinc remains enigmatic, and serves...
Inyong Choi

Inyong Choi, PhD

Title/Position
Associate Professor
Dr. Inyong Choi studies neural mechanisms of auditory processing, specifically as it applies to how the human brain segregates a target sound from a mixture of interfering sounds, how the ability degrades in hearing-impaired listeners, and how hearing interventions recover such neural processes...
Kirill Nourski

Kirill Nourski, MD, PhD

Title/Position
Associate Professor
I work in the Human Brain Research Laboratory with a team of neurosurgeons and neuroscientists, studying neurosurgical epilepsy patients who undergo electrode implantation for clinical diagnostic purposes. This provides a unique opportunity for direct electrophysiological recordings from the human...
YoungS

Samuel M. Young, PhD

Title/Position
Associate Professor
My laboratory is focused on the fundamental question– “How do synapses enable neuronal circuits to transmit a wide diversity of information?” Outcomes from our work will define the molecular principles that govern how synaptic properties drive neuronal circuit output which underpins organism...
GreenS

Steven H. Green, PhD

Title/Position
Professor
We study the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which neuronal survival and synaptogenesis are regulated by neural activity. For studies of survival, we principally use spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the cochlea. SGNs are dependent on their presynaptic input, the hair cells, for their survival...