Why Study Neuroscience?

The past two decades have witnessed spectacular conceptual and methodological advances in the biomedical/biobehavioral sciences, and especially in neuroscience. Developments in molecular biology, developmental and cell biology, neuroimaging, computer modeling, and the cognitive sciences have offered unprecedented insights to fundamental problems in the neurosciences. Significant steps are now being taken toward elucidating genetic and environmental disease mechanisms. New areas for fruitful investigation are developing, and scientists from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines meet at the frontiers.

The neuroscience community is poised for a quantum leap in the understanding of the biological substrates of phenomena that have provoked philosophical and scientific inquiry for thousands of years, including language, memory, emotional processing, social conduct, personality, decision-making, planning and judgment.

 

10x of a drosophila brain stained for the pigment dispersing factor (PDF) positive neurons which regulate circadian rhythm. (below) A 40x close up on

the branching and boutons of the PDF positive neurons in both the optic lobes – Image by Neuroscience student Arianna Lark


 

“I searched for a school that boasted a positive environment for collaboration, commitment to scientific training, and a high caliber of mentorship, all surrounded by a town I could feel at home in.  My first exposure to the University of Iowa was during a summer undergraduate research fellowship.  During that ten weeks training, I found that that the University of Iowa fulfilled all of my expectations for graduate school and much, much more.  It was that experience that I compared all of my other graduate interviews too, and needless to say, but I will anyway, I chose the University of Iowa. ”