Neurobiology of Disease NSCI:7235

Course Director:  Natalie Denburg

"Neurobiology of Disease" explores the basis of major diseases affecting the nervous system. This course has been developed in response to a nationwide concern that graduate students in neuroscience and other disciplines do not learn enough disease oriented biology. Experts from throughout the university will provide state of the art overviews on the clinical, neuropathological, physiological and molecular features of disease. Lecturers will also discuss key areas that hold promise for future research, including the development of rational therapies. Diseases to be discussed will include: neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer, Parkinson disease, expanded repeat diseases including Huntington's disease), neurodevelopmental disorders, muscular dystrophies, dystonia, stroke, epilepsy, anxiety or schizophrenia, among others.

Requirements: final term paper modeled on a research grant; participation in weekly discussion of topical research articles.


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